Plague Research - Bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, Infection, Types, Treatment

Plague Research Today is a free monthly online journal that collates and summarizes the latest research about Plague, including details on bubonic plague, yersinia pestis, infection, types, treatment.


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Palaeopathology and genes: Investigating the genetics of infectious diseases in excavated human skeletal remains and mummies from past populations.

Anastasiou E, Mitchell PD

Division of Biological Anthropology, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge, The Henry Wellcome Building, Fitzwilliam Street, Cambridge CB2 1QH, UK.

Published 8 July 2013 in Gene.
Full-text of this article is available online (may require subscription).


Articles on Plague published 8 July 2013:

Acquisition of omptin reveals cryptic virulence function of autotransporter YapE in Yersinia pestis.   Mol Microbiol, 89(2): 276-87.

Autotransporters, the largest family of secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, perform a variety of functions, including adherence, cytotoxicity and immune evasion. In Yersinia pestis the autotransporter YapE has adhesive properties and contributes to disease in the mouse model of bubonic plague. Here, we demonstrate that omptin cleavage of Y. pestis YapE is required to mediate bacterial aggregation and adherence to eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate that omptin cleavage is specific for ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 4 July 2013:

Epidemics in the news: Health and hygiene in the press in periods of crisis.   Public Underst Sci.

[Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 3 July 2013:

Effects of Low-Temperature Flea Maintenance on the Transmission of Yersinia pestis by Oropsylla montana.   Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis, 13(7): 468-78.

Abstract Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is primarily a rodent-associated, flea-borne zoonosis maintained in sylvatic foci throughout western North America. Transmission to humans is mediated most commonly by the flea vector Oropsylla montana and occurs predominantly in the southwestern United States. With few exceptions, previous studies showed O. montana to be an inefficient vector at transmitting Y. pestis at ambient temperatures, particularly when such fleas were fed on ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 1 July 2013:

Yersinia Pestis Infection in Cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.   J Feline Med Surg, 15(7): 582-4.

Overview: Plague, the medieval 'Black Death', is caused by a Gram-negative coccobacillus, Yersinia pestis, which also infects cats. As in people, it is transmitted from rodents through flea bites; it occurs in Asia, Africa and the Americas in flea-infested regions, all year round, and where rodent reservoirs are abundant. A poor prognosis is associated with high fever, and the pulmonary and septicaemic forms. Antibiotic therapy, flea control and avoidance of rodent contacts have made this ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 27 June 2013:

Applications of the Medial Femoral Condyle Free Flap for Foot and Ankle Reconstruction.   Foot Ankle Int.

[Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 25 June 2013:

History of human epidemic and endemic diseases in the southwest Indian Ocean.   Med Sante Trop.

[Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 19 June 2013:

Zoonotic disease risk and prevention practices among biologists and other wildlife workers--results from a national survey, us national park service, 2009.   J Wildl Dis, 49(3): 475-585.

In 2007, a National Park Service (NPS) biologist died from pneumonic plague after unprotected exposure to an infected mountain lion. This incident increased awareness of occupational zoonotic disease transmission and prompted an assessment of employees who handle wildlife. During April-June 2009, we conducted a national online survey of NPS biologists and other wildlife workers to assess in the preceding 12 mo: 1) potential work-related zoonotic disease exposures; 2) protective practices, ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Plague published 18 June 2013:

Na+/H+ antiport is essential for Yersinia pestis virulence.   Infect Immun.

Na(+)/H(+) antiporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins that play a central role in the ion homeostasis of cells. In this study, we examined the possible role of Na(+)/H(+) antiport in Yersinia pestis virulence and found that Y. pestis strains lacking the major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, NhaA and NhaB, are completely attenuated in an in vivo model of plague. The Y. pestis derivative strain lacking the nhaA and nhaB genes showed markedly decreased survival in blood and blood serum ex vivo. ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


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